Tag Archives: cuttings

Ficus cuttings, a great way to get more trees

Over the years I have taken many hundreds of cuttings. Most Ficus can be started easily from cuttings and even large size cuttings can be rooted with success.

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Ficus cutting about 8-9 years ago

This is a Ficus microcarpa cutting taken from one of my very large bonsai.

It was allowed to grow without trimming to recover strength and over time branches were selected to keep, other branches were removed and other branches were grafted into areas needing a branch. The bonsai after 9 years of training. Still not completed but it has come a long way from the start.

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Years later the same cutting is beginning to be an attractive bonsai

Consider rooting your extra cuttings to use for future bonsai.

 


The definitive reference work on Ficus
for bonsai. The book is a softcover, 8 by 10 inch volume, with 144 color pages, containing detailed information for the beginner as well as the advanced hobbyist.

Ficus ‘Little Ruby’

Bonsai artist and friend Anthony Webb has a lot of experience growing figs and one in particular that he likes and finds fascinating.
My plant of Ficus 'Little Ruby'

My plant of Ficus ‘Little Ruby’

Same fig 2011

Same tree, 2011

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Little Ruby on the left and normal Ficus rubigionsa, Port Jackson fig in the middle

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Note the small leaf size in comparison to normal Ficus rubiginosa

Here is Anthony’s summary about his experience with a Ficus rubiginosa ‘Little Ruby’ over 25 years.

“Ficus rubiginosa var Little Ruby is native to Australia.
A cultivar of Ficus rubiginosa (Port Jackson fig) was discovered in a batch of Ficus Rubiginosa seedlings.
Little Ruby can only be cultivated from cuttings and strikes quite easily.
Little Ruby is a slower growing fig with dark green narrow leaves.
My tree is approximately 25 years old, I have learnt that by letting the tree grow out then cutting to the desired shape. The foliage then thickens more than continually trying to force it back by cutting & pinching, as per a lot of other Figs.
Generally, I wire the trunk & primary branches to shape , but leave branch-lets & secondaries unwired as I find these areas brittle. By using my method of growing out, then trimming back I have had more success in developing. As my tree establishes more roots I will put into a bonsai pot.
I find it a fascinating tree but for me patience is needed.
Cheers Anthony”
For further information on Ficus rubiginosa click here.

Two of my Ficus ‘Mystery’, #1 and #2

Ficus 'Mystery' #1

Ficus ‘Mystery’ #1

Ficus ‘Mystery” is so called because its exact scientific name is unclear. No matter what this fig is called it is one of the best figs for bonsai that I have cared for.

Ficus 'Mystery' #2

Ficus ‘Mystery’ #2

You can see how these two figs were created from a tree given to me by David Fukumoto of www.fukubonsai.com by clicking here http://www.bonsaihunk.us/info/BreakingUpIsEasyToDo.html

One of David’s figs of this species is in the National Bonsai and Penjing Museum in Washington, DC. It is a beauty.

Let me know how you like mine.


The definitive reference work on Ficus
for bonsai. The book is a softcover, 8 by 10 inch volume, with 144 color pages, containing detailed information for the beginner as well as the advanced hobbyist.
 Click here for more information