Tag Archives: exposed root

Making your bonsai taller

With exposed root bonsai it is possible to create a taller tree. One can simply raise the tree up on its finer root system while keeping it supported with wire until the new roots harden sufficiently to make the trunk stable.

The new roots will need to be covered for some months until they harden off and become adapted to dry air. Once so adapted the alluminum foil can be removed.

Ficus in exposed root style but a bit too short

Root system elongated,  wire used for temporary support

Foil is placed for some months until newly exposed roots are stable

Taking a tree apart to improve it

This is a young rooted cutting of Ficus natalensis but the two roots as indicated did not look right to my eyes. So I split the tree and allowed it to sprout back. I like the two new pieces and with more growth I think each may work out to be a reasonable bonsai tree.

Ficus natalensis, rooted cutting, with arrows showing the roots that I did not like

Ficus natalensis, rooted cutting, with arrows showing the roots that I did not like

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The small root on the right sprouted out

The small root sprout has been potted up and will be allowed to grow to develop an apex

The small root sprout has been potted up and will be allowed to grow to develop an apex

The larger piece will need more development but I like it better now

The larger piece will need more development but I like it better now

Unusual style, Ficus ‘Mexicana’

Exposed root styles are one of may favorites.

This fig, Ficus that I call ‘Mexicana’ but whose real species name is unknown, is a root cutting of a mother tree. The original material was found in Mexico.

The exposed roots are interesting to my eye. The canopy is not yet clearly designed. At some future date I may have a better shape for this bonsai.

For now I enjoy it as an “unusual style”.

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Ficus in an exposed root styling

What do you think?

 


The definitive reference work on Ficus
for bonsai. The book is a softcover, 8 by 10 inch volume, with 144 color pages, containing detailed information for the beginner as well as the advanced hobbyist.
 Click here for more information

Two of my Ficus ‘Mystery’, #1 and #2

Ficus 'Mystery' #1

Ficus ‘Mystery’ #1

Ficus ‘Mystery” is so called because its exact scientific name is unclear. No matter what this fig is called it is one of the best figs for bonsai that I have cared for.

Ficus 'Mystery' #2

Ficus ‘Mystery’ #2

You can see how these two figs were created from a tree given to me by David Fukumoto of www.fukubonsai.com by clicking here http://www.bonsaihunk.us/info/BreakingUpIsEasyToDo.html

One of David’s figs of this species is in the National Bonsai and Penjing Museum in Washington, DC. It is a beauty.

Let me know how you like mine.


The definitive reference work on Ficus
for bonsai. The book is a softcover, 8 by 10 inch volume, with 144 color pages, containing detailed information for the beginner as well as the advanced hobbyist.
 Click here for more information
 

Which side do you like the best?

This is a young Ficus natalensis. Ficus natalensis is one of the best figs for bonsai as it is vigorous, develops aerial roots, tolerates growing in containers as well as growing well in relatively poor light.

Which of the two sides do you prefer?

This is side one, showing a prominent bend in the trunk/root

This is side one, showing a profusion of exposed roots

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This is side two showing a major prominent root/trunk movement